ornery Fellow

I received a letter today from the Chairman of the Sociology Department at the University of Wisconsin. It said, among other things,

Dear Mr. Paynter:

On behalf of the Department of Sociology of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, I would like to offer an invitation as an Honorary Fellow in our department from July 1, 2007 through June 30, 2008.

…. The status of Honorary Fellow gives you access to university libraries as well as some other privileges.

More than shameless bragging here, this post is my expression of delight that I’ll be privileged to work at the university this year with some brilliant and principled people as I attempt first to understand the drivers that influence racial disparities in criminal justice administration and how these disparities affect us culturally and personally, and second how public policy formation may proceed to achieve dramatic changes for the better in the current situation. My purpose will be to share my deepening understanding more widely with the general public and to organize a modest movement for social change around that shared understanding.

(Friends will smile as well at the fact that I have been given a key to the gate in the JSTOR wall.)Wish me luck.

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27 Comments

  1. jeneane
    Posted June 26, 2007 at 8:12 | Permalink

    can i carry yer books?

  2. Betsy Devine
    Posted June 26, 2007 at 8:52 | Permalink

    Wow-couldn’t happen to a more ornery fellow! Congrats to you and to U Wisc as well.

  3. Posted June 26, 2007 at 9:07 | Permalink

    Thanks Betsy, and Jeneane? What books? It’s all online now.

  4. William "Papa" Meloney
    Posted June 26, 2007 at 9:58 | Permalink

    For a full time people such as yourself being an Honorary Fellow might be a bit of challenge…but we know you are up for it.

    Well struck!

  5. Jon Husband
    Posted June 26, 2007 at 10:22 | Permalink

    Congratulations, fp. You’re one of the right people they could have chosen, IMO.

    Re: “it’s all online now” … I found this blog post interesting (Library Access, The Internet and the Shelling of Sarajevo.

    I linked to it and it occasioned the only time wood s lot has linked to my blog. In my books that means it (by Stephen Lewis) is good.

  6. Tree Shapiro
    Posted June 27, 2007 at 1:38 | Permalink

    Franklin, you have no fucking idea how hard it was to keep this info to myself, stoneface though I am.

    What say you we get a Wednesday Texas no hold ‘em going with some of those “smart” tenured putzes? Like shooting gefilte fish in a cracker barrel, Fellow.

    I’ll be needing your JSTOR id and pw. There’s some books on probability that are out of print behind that wall.

    Mazel-fuckin-tov!

  7. Zo
    Posted June 27, 2007 at 1:54 | Permalink

    ooh, the keys to the kingdom! lucky you - most deserving. have at it.

    luv,
    zo

  8. Scruggs
    Posted June 27, 2007 at 2:34 | Permalink

    Congratulations, Frank! I look forward to reading your research.

  9. Ronni Bennett
    Posted June 27, 2007 at 2:43 | Permalink

    Congratulations, Frank. I’m so jealous of that id/pw.

  10. Charles Follymacher
    Posted June 27, 2007 at 4:15 | Permalink

    “as I attempt first to understand the drivers that influence racial disparities in criminal justice administration and how these disparities affect us culturally and personally”

    Whut th…? How th…?
    Amazing. Jealousy is not quite the word for me Frank, but if anyone is going to study racial disparities from a Wisconsin home base, you make my short list fer sher.

    I look forward to your posts, m’man. Congratulations.

  11. Jmo
    Posted June 27, 2007 at 4:36 | Permalink

    AWESOME!

  12. Winston
    Posted June 27, 2007 at 5:10 | Permalink

    Many ornery fellows have crossed my path, but to my recollection you’re the first Honorary one. Congratulations and good luck with the explorations. As you life off from this launch pad, never forget the little people you stepped on to get there…

  13. Posted June 27, 2007 at 5:30 | Permalink

    Winston: :-)

    Jmo: just thanks. I’m glad you’re glad.

    Charles: thanks too. Your approval means a lot. Wisconsin is less the heartland and more the belly of the beast when it comes to enforcement and incarceration disparities.

    Ronni: I have an interesting story to tell you about beating my head against the JSTOR and Project Muse firewalls.

    Scruggs and Zo: thanks for your kind thoughts.

    Tree: I know some students on State Street who run a game that has been going non-stop since 1962 (except for a brief break the afternoon of 11/22/63). They always need ropers. Let me know if I can download anything for you.

    Jon: Thanks and good link.

    Papa: I expect to be stretched a little thin this year, but I seem to need less an less sleep these days.

    Thanks to everyone for all the good wishes. I’m a little embarrassed now that I’ve made so much of this, but it feels like s0me kind of milestone. Now I have to drill down from the general to the specific.

  14. liz
    Posted June 27, 2007 at 9:57 | Permalink

    congratulations, friend.

  15. Tom Shugart
    Posted June 27, 2007 at 2:40 | Permalink

    Amazing! Congratulations in order, of course, but one wonders-was any money passed under the table?

    Jes kiddin.’ Way to go, old boy!

  16. annie
    Posted June 27, 2007 at 6:45 | Permalink

    Most impressive. My very best wishes to you.
    (Everywhere, indeed!)

  17. Aunt Hentic
    Posted June 28, 2007 at 5:25 | Permalink

    Oh Frank! Congrats! I am so proud to call myself your internets buddy. Just about to go see what my hens have been up to and hopefully come back with a full handwoven native american basketfull of freshly laid free range eggywegs. :)

    If you’ll be packing a lunch for your Fellow days at the U, you might want to consider one of these baskets. It will certainly gain you some kudos and creedence (pun intended) :) with the youngsters you’ll most likely be running into at that fine academic institution. I find tie-dye also helps to open “the conversation”.

    * If you have to make a lot of sandwiches, try the assembly line method: Lay out slices of bread, spread each slice with butter, mustard, mayo or any other spread you are using. Go down the line and add toppings, finish with top slice of bread, then wrap.

    * For easier spreading, freeze breads first, then make your sandwiches. This can also help keep foods chilled and it will be thawed in time for lunch.

    * Use frozen ice packs to help keep cold foods cold. Freezing drinks like juices and iced teas can also help keep foods cold, and who doesn’t prefer a cold drink (keep in mind that the containers are likely to sweat while thawing, so wrap you food well so it doesn’t get soggy).
    * For a nutritious and low calorie lunch, pack some raw, or lightly steamed (then chilled) vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower or carrots. Add a small container of dip (or individual package of salad dressing) and you’ve got a great snack or lunch addition.

    * Hummus, whether used as a dip or a sandwich spread is a great addition to any lunchbox.

    * Don’t forget stuffed tomatoes! Stuff with tuna or egg salad or even potato, pasta or rice salad.

    * A thermos can keep things hot as well as cold, which opens up a host of lunchtime possibilities. How about soups, or pastas or even stir-frys? A wide mouthed thermos container can be the brown bagger’s best friend. Just fill with piping hot food and seal. It will stay hot until lunchtime.

    * Tired of the same old sandwich? How about cold pizza for lunch? Don’t forget salads instead of sandwiches (perfect for those cutting carbs).

    * What’s exotic for us in normal fare in Japan. Sushi Rolls make terrific lunchbox fare.

    * Frittatas are great served cold and are perfect for packing in a lunchbox.

    * Savory tarts, pies and quiches can often be served at room temperature and add an elegant touch to any box lunch.

    * If you and your co-workers bring your lunches to work, why not start a Brown Bag Club? Divide the week up between 5 co-workers, each day a different person brings brown bag lunches for the group!

    Have a good one! :) :) :)

  18. Peter (the Other)
    Posted June 28, 2007 at 6:11 | Permalink

    Oh you ARE a jolly good fellow,
    YOU are a jolly good fellow
    you are a jolly GOOD fellow
    yadaya yada yada

    Does that make you a “goodfella’”?

  19. Posted June 28, 2007 at 6:22 | Permalink

    Just sit down and have a sandwich and a hard boiled egg, Peter.

  20. Jill Draper
    Posted June 28, 2007 at 8:06 | Permalink

    I’m full of fine feeling for Fellow Frank. Freakin’ fantastic.

  21. Peter (the Other)
    Posted June 28, 2007 at 1:22 | Permalink

    Mmmmm thanks, I think I shall, is that watercress? My fav!

  22. Posted June 28, 2007 at 3:20 | Permalink

    Per Auntie’s instructions I’ve trimmed the crust and cut the watercress sandwiches on both diagonals. They make such a nice arrangement on a plate with a handful of blooms from wild columbines strewn across them.

  23. Tutor
    Posted June 28, 2007 at 9:33 | Permalink

    My oh my, what fun for you. I am sure you will do great work.

  24. tom matrullo
    Posted July 2, 2007 at 4:55 | Permalink

    belatedly - congwats Fwank! I’m happy to know a fellow who’s not just another brick in the Wall.

    & re: Ronni: I have an interesting story to tell you about beating my head against the JSTOR and Project Muse firewalls.

    I’d like to hear that one too…

  25. Shelley
    Posted July 2, 2007 at 8:57 | Permalink

    Congratulations, Frank. That’s very impressive. I hope it becomes a rewarding experience for you.

  26. tamarika
    Posted July 3, 2007 at 8:40 | Permalink

    Oh dear - I’ve been away and missed these celebrations! Well deserved! Congratulations, Frank! Enjoy those privileges.

  27. autodidact
    Posted July 26, 2007 at 6:59 | Permalink

    (just now catching up!) Good work. & to think that once you were but a humble library page. . .